Delightfully Dippy Dinosaur Names In Celebration of Jurassic World: Dominion

Just for Fun: Delightfully Dippy Dinosaur Names In Celebration of Jurassic World: Dominion

Friday 10th June 2022   /   Just for Fun   /   0 Comment(s)

Delightfully Dippy Dinosaur Names In Celebration of Jurassic World: Dominion

To celebrate the release of Jurassic World: Dominion, we decided to take a look at some of the more unusual inspirations for dinosaur names. Plus, we explain why it’s always better to go bigger when picking your pack size of Stikins name labels.

Delightfully Dippy Dinosaur Names

The release of Jurassic World: Dominion prompted us to take a closer look at dinosaur names. The name “dinosaur” was created in 1841 by the English biologist and palaeontologist Sir Richard Owen. It combines two Greek words – deinos (terrible) and sauros (lizard) – and so “dinosaur” actually means “terrible lizard”!

Each type of dinosaur has a name made up of two parts, usually based on Greek or Latin terms. The first part is the genus (a group of related species) and the second is the species. Many dinosaurs are known only by their genus name – like Triceratops, which has two confirmed species, called Triceratops horridus and Triceratops prorsus.

Most dinosaurs are named after a defining physical characteristic, the place they were found, or someone involved in their discovery and identification. For example: Triceratops comes from the Greek words tri (three), keras (horn), and ops (face) and means “three-horned face”.

There are, however, a handful of dinosaurs with names that come from more unusual sources:

Dinosaur Name

Meaning

Inspiration

Bambiraptor feinbergi

Bambi Thief

Named after the Disney character due to its small stature. 

Borogovia gracilicrus

Lightly Built Shin

The genus of this bird-like species comes from Borogoves – fictional avian creatures from Lewis Carroll’s poem The Jabberwocky.

Crichtonsaurus bohlini

Crichton’s Lizard

Named in honour of Michael Crichton – the author of Jurassic Park.

Dracorex hogwartsia

Dragon King of Hogwarts

This species’ spikes and frills reminded scientists of a fictional dragon and inspired them to name it after Hogwarts from the Harry Potter series.

Gojirasaurus quayi

Godzilla Lizard

Named for the film character Gojira – Godzilla – due to its large size.

Sauroniops pachytholus

Eye of Sauron

Due to the single bone above its eye socket, this species was named after the Lord of the Rings character (who is often represented by a single eye).

Tianchiasaurus nedegoapeferima – formerly Jurassosaurus nedegoapeferima

Heavenly Pool Lizard

 “Jurassosaurus” was suggested by Steven Spielberg but later replaced. The species name honours the main cast of Spielberg’s film Jurassic Park.
(Sam NEill, Laura DErn, Jeff GOldblum, Richard ATtenborough, Bob PEck, Martin FErrero, Ariana RIchards, and Joseph MAzzello)

Zuul crurivastator

Destroyer of Shins

Named after the demi-god Zuul from Ghostbusters due to their similarly shaped heads with short, rounded snouts and prominent horns behind the eyes. 

Reasons To Choose A Large Pack Of Stikins Name Labels

When you order Stikins, we give you a choice of four pack sizes; 30, 60, 90, or 120 name labels. Customers often ask us what pack we think they should order. Our advice is: it depends on how many things you need to label – but, if you’re not sure, a bigger pack is generally the better option because:

  • IT’S ALWAYS BETTER TO HAVE MORE THAN YOU NEED
    If you buy a bigger pack, you might end up with more name labels than you need at the moment BUT you (probably!) won’t run out and have to spend more money ordering a few extras.
  • IT’S ALWAYS GOOD TO HAVE AN EMERGENCY STASH
    Buying a bigger pack gives you extra name labels for future name labelling emergencies. For example, if you have last minute school kit to buy, if you have a growth spurt to contend with, or if you simply forget an item and need to get it labelled on your way out of the door.
  • IT’S ALWAYS GREAT TO SAVE MONEY
    Our larger packs offer better value for money. All of our packs have to cover manufacturing and delivery costs, which places a bigger burden on our smaller packs. For example, our N30 pack costs £6.80 (including VAT and delivery), which creates a cost of around 23p per label. An N60 pack costs 16p per label, an N90 costs 13p per label, and an N120 pack costs 12p per label.

You can order any of our packs online or by phone (our office hours are 9am-5pm, Mon-Fri). We also offer a 10% discount when you order 3 or more packs. Your packs can be all the same or entirely different. Our offer applies automatically when you order online or by phone. 

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